Highway All-Season light truck tires are for drivers who want a combination of pleasant on-road characteristics, long wear and all-season versatility, including traction in light snow. Highway All-Season tires branded with the M+S symbol are often used as Original Equipment (O.E.) on 2WD and 4WD, light- and medium-duty vans, trucks and pickups, as well as crossover and sport utility vehicles.

O.E. Highway All-Season light truck tires are typically purchased as direct replacements for worn-out pairs/sets of the vehicle’s original tires. They can also be used for other vehicle applications in complete sets of four or axle pairs if available in an appropriate size, load range and speed rating to match the existing O.E. tires’ performance category and specifications.

7 COMMENTS

  1. So quiet. And smooth. Replaced an aggressive tread tire with these and have no regrets. Gained 1 mpg instantly, now closer to 2 that they have worn in for 10,000 miles. Not sure how they’ll do long term, I see Ford is using them as OEM now on the F-150, and if you get 45k out of OEM you’re doing alright. For the price, a really good tire. Only thing I’ve noticed is that they like to walk around a bit on grooved highway pavement.

  2. After 1 month, 700 miles, and 3 snow storms, these OEM tires went off to the wholesaler.I can’t see why Ford would put these on a 4wd vehicle. They were very poor on packed snow.

  3. These tires came factory on my F150. I came from a set of Genral Grabber AT2’s on my last pickup, being a highway tire I knew these wouldn’t be close to the same, but when it comes to winter driving these tires slip right past poor and crash right into down right dangerous. While the siping looks ok for a highway tire, they do not perform up to par in winter conditions. Even light snow (1-3″) start to cause traction issues, deep snow (over 6″) will surely lead to you getting hopelessly stuck with nothing but spinning tires. Any packed snow or ice is where they get downright scary. Stopping becomes an issue, but getting going is a real issue. Trying to pull away from a stop sign if there is cross traffic coming requires multiple blocks of space between the oncoming cars or you will be half into the intersection with you hopelessly trying to get going and your tires doing nothing but spinning in place. Even low speed cornering becomes an issue on ice and packed snow. If you live in a southern state with no snow, these would probably be an acceptable on-road tire, but if you get winter don’t risk it.

  4. So far I am very impressed with these tires. Michigan has thrown every winter trick at us in the last month and the tires have done very well. I had BFG All Terrains on (never again) which wore unevenly and had become very loud at only 25k miles. Michelin Primacy XC are very quiet! Much better noise level and ride quality. I have not towed my camper yet, so performance there remains to be seen. My only complaint is that they don’t like grooved highway pavement. They walk around a bit trying to line up with the grooves. Other than that, another quality Michelin product.

  5. These came on my truck new. They are decent tires on dry roads and are very quite but, they leave a lot to be desired for safety in any kind of winter/snow traction.

  6. I have only had these tires for about a month, and I regret buying them. They ride HARD! I know that our central New York roads take a lot of abuse from winter, and they aren’t too smooth, but compared to the Goodyear Wranglers that I had before, these ride like solid plastic. Every bump is a jolt. I am even considering buying something else and hoping I can sell them on craigslist. Not sure if I want to go through another 2-3 years like this.

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